National Writers Union Leads, Ebony-Magazine Misses Deadline Paid Payment

National Writers Union Leads Suit Against Ebony Magazine for Nonpayment

Black magazine, the subject of a Twitter dissent battle #EbonyOwes this spring for neglecting to pay fifty independent essayists up to $200,000, is currently the subject of a claim brought by the National Writers Union in the interest of the unpaid scholars. The union is speaking to thirty essayists who are owed around $60,000 all in all. On June 3, Ebony set a willful due date to pay all the back cash, yet that due date go without an entire reimbursement. Their announcement, tweeted by NBC BLK, peruses, “Midnight Media is working determinedly to streamline and enhance efficiencies all through our operations. The association is completely dedicated to paying its authors and specialists completely and ought to have this issue settled inside the following 30 days… ”

In an announcement, NWU’s Larry Goldbetter stated, “This is totally inadmissible.… We trusted them, in compliance with common decency, regardless of a few consultants going over a year without installment. Presently, we proceed onward to the following stage.”

The Union’s official statement on the issue expresses, “The union got included for the specialists after #EbonyOwes started slanting on Twitter. Essayist Jagger Blaec softened the story up an article that showed up on The Establishment’s site in April.”

In April, Jagger Blaec announced that independent columnist Cat Distasio had tweeted, “As yet sitting tight for $2000 from @EbonyMag months after my work. Per my agreement w @thekylesfiles it’s 150+ days PAST DUE,” trailed by “I am not by any means the only one who is owed thousands by @ebonymag. I have addressed no less than about six authors who have not been paid for 2016 work.”

Another author, Liz Dwyer, disclosed to NPR that she was not paid for three articles written in the fall of 2016 for the February 2017 issue until simply this month. She is one of just three journalists who have gotten full installment for their work amid the thirty-day time frame in which all were to be paid. Eight different essayists got some installment, yet not everything they were owed.

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